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Finding Treblinka - Wiener Library

The Wiener Library

For the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide

Finding Treblinka

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Professor

Wall of Honour commemorative plaques

 

Each plaque on the Wall of Honour carries the name of the person being honoured and is linked to a page on our Digital Wall of Honour. Full details of the person’s life and achievements, additional commemorative words, such as reflections on their life, personal recollections by family members or friends, photographs, poems or passages from Scripture can be recorded here.

For more information please contact the Development Coordinator at The Wiener Library on 020 7636 7247 or development@wienerlibrary.co.uk

 

images/medium/WL_WoH_donation_form_for_website.pdf

Wall of Honour

During the 53 years that the Library occupied its former home at 4 Devonshire Street, supporters who wished to commemorate a loved one or friend had the option of placing a brass plaque in the Library’s Reading Room. The presence of over 100 plaques gave the Reading Room a very special quality and reminded all visitors of the individuality of those touched by the Holocaust. 

Thanks to a generous gift, these plaques have been refurbished and mounted in our Wolfson Reading Room to perpetuate our commitment to honour these men and women.

We are now able to offer a unique new way of honouring and commemorating family, friends and colleagues.  

We have created the Wall of Honour to provide an opportunity to anyone who would like to honour a loved-one, friend or someone who has inspired them, and to raise essential funds to support the core work of the Library. As a registered charity The Wiener Library relies on our friends and supporters to continue and develop our vital work.

Click here to request a plaque

The Wiener Library sends a free monthly E-Newsletter with all our recent news and upcoming events. To subscribe, please fill out the form opposite.

Our Annual Review demonstrates our achievements each year as we work to transform the Library into the open, accessible and authoritative centre that Britian needs and deserves: our National Holocaust Archive.

Read past editions of our E-Newsletter and Annual Reviews below: 

The Library has created a number of guides to help users navigate our collections.

Each guide introduces the material available at the Library on specific subjects, as well as online resources and sources of further information.  Guides are currently available on:

Jewish Relief Organisations

Refugees

Kindertransport

War Crime Trials

German soldiers taking pictures of the Lvov pogrom of Summer 1941

German soldiers taking pictures during the Lvov pogrom of 30 June to 3 July 1941

Image WL5255

The Wiener Library has a collection of over 17,000 images of the Holocaust and related subjects originating from private and institutional collections.  They form a valuable resource for historians, researchers and educators and are regularly used by the media, publishers and film producers.

The collection covers:

  • Jewish culture and everyday life in Germany and Europe before the Holocaust
  • Refugees and emigration including the Kindertransport
  • The Holocaust in Germany and in German-occupied Europe
  • Antisemitism, discrimination and persecution of Jews before and after 1933.

In addition, we hold images relating to:

  • The Weimar Republic 1918-1933 and the rise of the Nazi movement
  • Politics, economy, and culture in Nazi Germany
  • The Nazi party, SA and SS
  • Resistance against Nazi rule
  • The post-war trials of Nazi war criminals
  • Jews in the post-war World
  • Jewish cemeteries and synagogues in Germany and Europe
  • Monuments and memorials commemorating the Holocaust all over Europe.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, the collection is still growing. If you have images that you wish to donate, please see our section on Building the Collection.

How to Search and Request Photographs
In order to preserve our original prints and allow for greater access to our photo collection, we are in the process of digitising our photographs.  You can access a growing selection of images through our online catalogue by entering a term into the search field above and selecting ‘Photographs' from the drop-down menu. The search results will display relevant images. If you wish to request any images please contact our Head of Collections, Kat Hübschmann, by email at khubschmann@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Please include the following in your email request:

  • The photo ID (found at the bottom of the catalogue record, eg. WL2231)
  • The intended use of the selected image(s)
  • Your postal address
  • Your phone number

Please note that only a small selection of our images are currently searchable online.  If you wish to search the full collection please contact our Head of Collections, Kat Hübschmann, by email at khubschmann@wienerlibrary.co.uk

The Wiener Library has a collection of audio and audio-visual material, mostly consisting of interviews with former refugees and survivors, but also including some films and documentaries and recordings of past Wiener Library lectures.

A selection of the Library's audio-visual material can be searched via our online catalogue, but for further enquiries and for information regarding viewing facilities please contact us at info@wienerlibrary.co.uk.

A volunteer at the library

The Wiener Library has a strong tradition of working with volunteers. Our volunteers are vitally important to us as an organisation and we could not achieve what we do without them. 

Our roles offer people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds the chance to gain new skills and knowledge. Many of our volunteering roles, including social media assistants, bloggers and event assistants, are designed to be flexible and fit around your studies, training or job, making them ideal for younger volunteers. All of our roles allow volunteers the chance to gain experience in many aspects of Library life.  

If you would like to find out more about what different volunteering roles at the Library involve, and the kinds of skills that you can acquire through volunteering at the Library, please read through the role descriptions below.

We are currently recruiting for the following volunteering roles:

Please contact our Volunteer Coordinator, Leah Sidebotham at lsidebotham@wienerlibrary.co.uk to register your interest for any of these roles.

The Wiener Library Ernst Fraenkel Prize (WLEFP) is a prestigious competition for book-length academic manuscripts on the Holocaust, its context and implications, and twentieth century and post-Holocaust genocides.

As the Prize reached its 25th anniversary in 2014, we wanted to re-evaluate its remit to ensure that it continues to reflect the Library’s fields of interest, which have evolved over the years. Following the death of Ernst Fraenkel OBE in late 2014, the Prize was suspended for a year in 2016 and we took this opportunity to work with our trustees and with the Fraenkel family to revise the rules of the competition and the subject areas it covers.

Please note that from 2017 there will no longer be two categories; WLEFP is a single prize of £5,000, open to anyone who has not published more than two books (monographs). Please refer to the list of eligible subject areas and restrictions before sending your submission.

The following subject areas are eligible:

  • The History of Antisemitism
  • The History of Nazism
  • Refugees and Exiles
  • The Holocaust
  • Genocide
  • Jewish History in the twentieth century as it pertains to the Holocaust
  • World War Two
  • Studies of post-Holocaust issues, for example memory, commemoration, justice, Holocaust literature and art, philosophical and theological responses etc.

Restrictions

  • Entry is restricted to an author’s first or second book (monograph)
  • The manuscript must be unpublished at the closing date for submissions
  • The work must be written in English
  • English translations of books previously published in another language will not be eligible
  • Book manuscripts submitted in previous years may not be resubmitted in any following year
  • The panel reserves the right not to consider any work that falls outside the specified subject areas or fails to meet entry requirements.

Current Vacancies

Conservation and preservation are an integral part of The Wiener Library's work – work that takes time and is often expensive. Often there are individual items that require specific conservation, but there is an equal need to care for and protect the whole collection. In the long term, these preventative measures are more effective than treating items once damage has occurred, and the Library is continuously improving its preservation methods.

The Wiener Library's collections are vital sources of information that exist to be used by readers. Unlike museum items, they cannot be consigned to permanent storage in the sole interest of their conservation. Any preservation has to ensure protection and survival whilst encouraging usage. This is The Wiener Library's challenge.

Your gift helps us to protect our unique collections for future generations. Adopt-a-Book donations enable us to display, house, and store our materials in the best possible manner for the use of current and future readers.

The Wolfson Reading Room is open to the public on weekdays free of charge.

You are welcome to visit us and study our books, documents and photographs in the Wolfson Reading Room. It is not necessary to make an appointment or become a member in order to use the materials available. However, all first-time readers are required to bring the following:

  • Non-student visitors must bring some form of photographic ID together with proof of address.
  • Students using the Library for the first time must bring some form of photographic ID and a letter of introduction from their tutor or employer.

A large collection of books is available in the Wolfson Reading Room on open access. Documents, photographs, fragile material and rare books are stored elsewhere in the building. Readers can search this material in the catalogue and request it using call slips available in the Reading Room. Material will be brought up within 15 minutes of requesting it.

Some material is stored offsite, this is marked on the catalogue record. Please note that it takes seven working days to retrieve items from our offsite storage facility.

Internet access is available via our public access computers in the Wolfson Reading Room and through our wireless network.

Skills Workshops

Archive photo of a workshop taking place

Our skills workshops are designed to help you get the most of the Wiener Library's extensive collections. Over the course of the year we run introductory sessions to familiarise Readers with different parts of the collections, led either by our Senior Librarian or one of our Archivists.

To book a place at a workshop or event please contact the Library. Unless otherwise stated, all of our skills workshops will be held at The Wiener Library, 29 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DP.

Whether you are a sixth-former, a student or an independent adult learner who wishes to understand more about the Holocaust and other genocides, The Wiener Library is here to help facilitate your learning. We have worked with several outside organisations to provide stimulating workshops, including the Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain, the Institute for Germanic and Romance Studies, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Holocaust Educational Trust.

In addition to skills workshops we also regularly hold panel discussions and debates, lectures, film screenings and temporary exhibitions. For more information on these events please see the What's On page.

The Library holds over 3000 titles of serials, 132 of which are current subscriptions. Our holdings include academic journals covering Holocaust and genocide studies, antisemitism and memory; organisational newsletters from refugee and exile organisations and memorial institutions; political magazines, both fascist and anti-fascist, and select newspapers for Jewish communities.

View a full list of current subscriptions

Current Subscriptions

Current Subscriptions

Please select one of the following:  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T U V W Y Z

A
ACJR Newsletter
The Aegis Review on Genocide
AJEB – so what's new
AJL Association of Jewish Libraries Newsletter
AJR Journal Association of Jewish Refugees
Aktuell : Informationen aus und über Berlin
Allemagne d'aujourd'hui
Antifa
Antifaschistisches Infoblatt
Aufbau
Aus Politik und Zeitgeschichte APuZ

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B
Begegnungen : Zeitschrift für Kirche und Judentum
Blick nach Rechts
Bulletin du CEGES (Centre d'Etudes et de Documentation "Guerre et Societes contemporaines")
Bulletin Simon-Dubnow-Institut für jüdische Geschichte und Kultur

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C
Cahiers de l'Alliance israelite universelle
Cahiers du judaïsme
Centre for German-Jewish Studies Newsletter
CHGS (The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies) newsletter
CJCR Newsletter
Contemporary European History
Commentary
Congress Monthly

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D
Debatte
Deutschland - forum on politics, culture, business & science
Deutschland in Geschichte und Gegenwart
Dialog
Dokumentationszentrum des Bundes Jüdischer Verfolgter des Naziregimes - Bulletin
Dokumentationszentrum Oberer Kuhberg Ulm Mitteilungen
Dunera News

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E
East European Jewish Affairs
Der Eckart
Europäische Ideen
Europäische Rundschau
European History Quarterly
European Judaism
European Race Bulletin
Exil: Forschung, Erkenntnis, Ergebnisse
exilOgraph

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F
Filantropia
Freiburger Rundbrief
Der Freiwillige

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G
Gedenkstätten-Rundbrief
Gegen Vergessen
Die Gemeinde
German Historical Institute Bulletin
German History
German Politics
Geschichte in Wissenschaft und Unterricht
Guerres mondiales et conflicts contemporaines
Gurs, souvenez-vous

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H
Hidden Child
History & Memory
Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Holocaust Centre Beth Shalom News
Holocaust Studies : a journal of Culture and History
Holocaust Survivors Centre News (Australia)

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I
IHR update Institute for Historical Review
Illustrierte neue Welt
Informatiebulletin Stichting Nationaal Monument Kamp Amersfoort
Informationen Studienkreis: Deutscher Widerstand
Informationen zur modernen Stadtgeschichte
Institute News / The International Institute for Holocaust Research
Instituut voor joodse studies nieuwsbrief
Israel-Judaica Collector formerly Judaica Collector

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J
Jerusalem Report
Jewish Affairs
The Jewish Chronicle
Jewish Currents
Jewish Museum of Australia Journal
Jewish Social Studies
Jewish Socialist & Jewish Socialist Newsletter
Journal of Contemporary History
Journal of Genocide Research
Journal of Modern European History
Journal of Modern History
Journal of Modern Jewish Studies
Jüdische Allgemeine
Jüdische Korrespondenz

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K
Kalonymos
Kindertransport Newsletter
Konkret

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L
Learning Lessons

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M
Die Mahnung
MB Mitteilungsblatt des Irgun Olei Merkas Europa
Midstream
Militärgeschichtliche Zeitschrift + War & Society
Mittelweg 36
Mitteilungen : Dokumentationsarchiv des österreichischen Widerstandes
Mut

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N
Nation & Europa
Nationalzeitung
Der Neue Mahnruf
Neue politische Literatur
New German Critique
Newsletter / American Friends of the Ghetto Fighters' House
Newsletter Anlaufstelle der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde Wien für jüdische NS-Verfolgte in und aus Österreich. Holocaust Victims' Information and Support Center
Newsletter / Fritz-Bauer-Institute
Newsletter / Jewish Music Institute
Newsletter / Multi-Generation Nuernberg / Fuerth Global Family
Newsletter / Zentrum für Antisemitismusforschung

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O
Our congregation / News and views from Belsize Square Synagoge

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P
Past Forward
Patterns of Prejudice
Politik und Unterricht
Prispevki za novejso zgodovino
Pro memoria. Information Bulletin of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum and the Auschwitz-Birkenau Death Camp Victims Memorial Foundation
Przeglad Zachodni

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R
Der rechte Rand
Regards
Remember
Response
Revue d'histoire de la Shoah
Revue juive
Ros Chodes

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S
Schalom - Zeitschrift des jüdischen Museums Westfalen
Searchlight
Second Generation Voices
Shemot
Der Spiegel
Stammbaum
Storia contemporanea

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T
The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain Newsletter
Tkuma - Rebirth. Newsletter of the Central Ukrainian Holocaust Foundation
Tribüne

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U
Uj elet

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V
Vierteljahrshefte für Zeitgeschichte

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W

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Y
Yad Vashem quarterly magazine
Yalkut Moreshet Holocaust Documentation and Research
Yevreyskaya Gazeta
Yivo News

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Z
Zeichen (Aktion Sühnezeichen Friedensdienste)
Zeitschrift für Genozidforschung
Zpravodaj Newsletter

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Ben Barkow

Ben Barkow, Director
'Never Again' travelling exhibition on display in Parliament, 2009

'Never Again' travelling exhibition on display in Parliament, 2009

The Wiener Library's Travelling Exhibitions have been designed specially for organisations and institutions to educate and inform their own audiences regardless of space and budgets available. The exhibitions incorporate the Library's unique collection into an accessible display to encourage people of all backgrounds to think critically about the issues raised by the Holocaust and genocide.

The exhibitions are free to hire but we ask for a fully-refundable deposit of £250 per exhibition. 

The Library offers a number of ways to donate in memory of a friend or relative.

In 2013, the Wiener Library celebrated its 80th anniversary year. To commemorate this important event, the Library published an anniversary photo book, In Celebration of the 80th Anniversary of The Wiener Library November, 2013. This small book, currently on sale at the Library for £5, features a photo series by Ali Mobasser, Russell Weekes & Marianne Noble Photography, Art Direction & Design.

Below are the contents of this book, including images and descriptions of significant items from our collections selected by Library staff and volunteers for this project.

The Wiener Library is a registered charity and we rely on the generosity of our donors and supporters to care for our collections and develop our work.

Individuals, charitable trusts and companies help the Library to open our collections to anyone who wants, or needs, to use them, and to engage people of all ages and backgrounds in building an understanding of the Holocaust and genocide.

Our donors help make The Wiener Library one of the most important Holocaust archives in the world.  Thank you.

Burning synagogue in Bamberg, Bavaria during the November Pogrom 1938

On November 9th and 10th 1938, simultaneously in hundreds of towns across Germany and Austria, thousands of Jews were terrorised, persecuted and victimised. The November Pogrom, known alternatively as 'Kristallnacht', also led to the desecration of over 1,200 synagogues and the looting of thousands of Jewish businesses and homes. Following the assassination of a junior diplomat in Paris by a young Polish Jew, the Nazi Party seized the opportunity to incite mass anti-Jewish violence. They nevertheless denied planning and orchestrating this wave of terror, claiming it instead as a spontaneous popular ‘retaliation’ against the ‘enemy within’. As a result approximately 90 people were killed and over 25,000 Jewish men were arrested and deported Dachau, Buchenwald and Sachsenhausen, leading to the deaths of hundreds more in the camps. The November Pogrom is seen by many as marking the beginning of the Holocaust. It triggered major policy changes as the Nazi regime began to pursue more aggressive measures against the Jews, which were nonetheless presented as ‘lawful’. 

Alfred Wiener had already been documenting Nazi crimes for many years when news of the November Pogrom first reached him and his colleagues in Amsterdam, which had been their place of refuge from Nazi persecution since 1933. From their headquarters at the Jewish Central Information Office (JCIO), Wiener used his unrivalled network of contacts to collect over 350 eyewitness accounts describing the events of 9 and 10 November in cities, towns and villages throughout Germany and Austria. The accounts took a number of different forms, including face-to-face and telephone interviews, letters, written reports and newspaper articles. Some of the voices are raw and angry, some call for help, others are defiant; they evoke the confusion, fear and chaos of the moment - capturing an important escalation in Nazi anti-Jewish terror that would soon lead toward the Holocaust.

DP Camps Press

There were hundreds of camps for so-called displaced persons (DPs) – across occupied Germany but mostly in the British and American Zones. The camps became a temporary home for Jewish survivors, with their own administration, schools, and even a football league. The last camp closed in 1957.

Initially many camps had their own newsletter, with time, and as the many camps were consolidated, the newsletters of the larger camps, such as Unzer SztymeOur Voice published in Bergen-Belsen took over.

In addition to our own collection we also hold a copy of the YIVO Jewish Displaced Persons Periodicals Collection on microfilm. 

Visit The Wiener Library

Woman viewing an exhibition

The following links are for external resources relating to victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

For research into the fate of individuals, The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names, compiled by Yad Vashem, is a good place to start.

A full list of deportations from the Nazi Reich, Belgium, France and the Netherlands can be found on the Bundesarchiv website.


Additional resources are available for specific countries. Resources relating to specific camps and ghettos are listed under the country where they were:

There are hundreds of educational and learning resources available online relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era. The following links represent a small selection that may be of use to students, educators and the public.

The following external links are for museums, archives, educational organisations and research institutions relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era.  They are organised alphabetically by country.

The Wiener Library is a non-profit making company limited by guarantee. We are registered as a charity with the Charity Commission, our charity number is 313015.

© Gauri Gill, 2005

The genocidal pogroms against the Sikh people in India in November 1984 left thousands dead. In many of the outer areas of the capital, New Delhi, whole neighbourhoods were wiped out. Women were raped in large numbers. Senior politicians of the Congress (I) party led mobs, assisted by the police and administration. Thirty years on no memorials exist to the dead and the perpetrators continue to enjoy complete impunity. But the silence is slowly breaking. Not just about the damage caused to the justice system, memory and language in India, but also about the individual and collective trauma that exists within Sikh communities across the world. 

Marking the 30th anniversary of the November 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms, the Wiener Library is delighted to feature the work 1984: Jis tann lãgé soee jãné by photographer Gauri Gill. The images and texts from the artist's 1984 notebooks reflect upon the pogroms and their ongoing impact in India. The images are from the resettlement colonies of Trilokpuri, Tilak Vihar and Garhi - various sites across Delhi - as well as protest rallies in the city. The accompanying texts by leading artists, poets, filmmakers and writers from Delhi remark upon the event, via the images, in thoughtful ways. 

The exhibition also contains photographs of the pogrom as it occurred in November 1984 itself, and are drawn from the work of Indian photographers, Ashok Vahie, Ram Rahman and Sondeep Shankar. 

Contributors to this project include contemporary Indian artist Arpana Caur; Senior Advocate and Human Rights activist, Harvinder Singh Phoolka, academic Dr Navsharan Singh; eminent historian Dr Uma Chakravarti; prizewinning Canadian author Jaspreet Singh and Parvinder Singh of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ). 

Image right: Sikhs protesting against the Nanavati Commission report. New Delhi 2005. Copyright Gauri Gill.

Admission to the exhibition is free. Open 10am-5pm Monday-Friday, and until 7.30pm on Tuesdays.

The exhibition has been extended until 23 January 2015.

We are committed to making the Library and its collections accessible to the widest possible audience.

If you have any comments, questions, or concerns regarding accessibility at the Library, please email us at info@wienerlibrary.co.uk or call us at +44 (0) 20 7636 7247.

A delegation of dignitaries and professionals from Herero and Nama with Library staff, Wiener Library, 10 July 2015

A delegation of dignitaries and professionals from Herero and Nama with Library staff, Wiener Library, 10 July 2015

Here at The Wiener Library we’re committed to engaging communities with our unique collections. Our mission is to provide the opportunity for people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds to learn about the history of the Holocaust and genocide in a supportive environment. 

We’re always seeking to build relationships with local and international groups and to introduce new audiences to our collections. Throughout the year we have projects like creative writing workshops, conservation skills training, exhibition tours, family days and more for our community audience.

In addition to these projects, we also offer the following activities for free (unless otherwise stated). Book in advance by contacting the Library’s Learning team at learning@wienerlibrary.co.uk or by calling the Library on 020 7636 7247.

2014 Wiener Library International Artistsâ?? Book Competition and Exhibition, London

20 March 2014-20 June 2014

The story of the Kitchener camp is not as well known as that of the Kindertransport, but it is in many ways equally remarkable. In 1939 nearly four thousand men were given visas to travel to the camp at Richborough near Sandwich, Kent, many of them following imprisonment in Nazi concentration camps. Cultural life at the camp flourished, and fears about the influx of refugees inflaming local tensions and giving momentum to the British fascists did not materialise. The Kitchener camp had a positive impact on Sandwich and the region, and has left an important legacy in local memory.

Through the display of the Wiener Library’s exceptionally rich collection of photographs and original documents as well as specially loaned original artworks, this exhibition gives a vivid impression of the history and life of the camp. A deeper understanding of the camp’s history can also be explored in Clare Ungerson’s new book, Four Thousand Lives: The Rescue of German Jewish Men to Britain, 1939, published in March this year by the History Press, on which this exhibition is based.

The exhibition has been co-curated by Clare Ungerson, Professor Emerita of the University of Southampton and Dr Toby Simpson of The Wiener Library. 

‘Four Thousand Lives: The Kitchener Camp Rescue’ runs at The Wiener Library, 29 Russell Square from Thursday 19 March 2014 to Wednesday 20 June 2014. Admission is free.

Please note: The run of this exhibition has been extended in order to be on display throughout UK Refugee Week.

 

Refugee Family Papers: An Interactive Map

The Library’s refugee family papers and audio testimonies are among its most valuable educational and research resources, and that is why we have made great efforts to bring these materials to our online audiences, especially those who are not able to travel to the Library. 

Our new digital map will give everybody the opportunity to browse and search a wide selection of The Wiener Library's collections of refugee family papers as well as extensive clips from the AJR Refugee Voices audio-visual archive. Hundreds of these collections have been donated to the Library over the years by Jewish refugees and their families, who escaped Nazi antisemitic persecution by emigrating from Germany and other Nazi-dominated countries, including Poland, Austria, and France.

To celebrate the launch of ‘Refugee Family Papers: An Interactive Map’ we will be curating a temporary exhibition that showcases a selection of the original materials that have recently been scanned for inclusion on the map. This exhibition has been extended until Tuesday 5 May and highlights the history of the Jewish communities of cities that feature prominently on the digital map.

This new digital resource is now live. To use it please click here.

To read more about the project, see the article that has recently been posted our News page.

The following links are for external resources relating to victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

For research into the fate of individuals, The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names, compiled by Yad Vashem, is a good place to start.

A full list of deportations from the Nazi Reich, Belgium, France and the Netherlands can be found on the Bundesarchiv website.


Additional resources are available for specific countries. Resources relating to specific camps and ghettos are listed under the country where they were:

The strength of the Press Cuttings collection is the ability to browse by subject, with material from different countries and publications filed in chronological order. This arrangement enables researchers to make connections and discoveries not possible through online searching. The cuttings in the archive trace the changing attitudes to, and perceptions of, the Holocaust, as well as the shaping of collective and public memory over time. The Holocaust is a relatively recent event and the archive demonstrates its continuing integration into the historical narrative, as well as on-going developments in commemoration and memorialisation.  Nowhere is this process better illustrated than in the press.

In 2013, the Wiener Library celebrated its 80th anniversary year. To commemorate this important event, the Library published an anniversary photo book, In Celebration of the 80th Anniversary of The Wiener Library November, 2013. This small book, currently on sale at the Library for £5, features a photo series by Ali Mobasser, Russell Weekes & Marianne Noble Photography, Art Direction & Design.

Below are the contents of this book, including images and descriptions of significant items from our collections selected by Library staff and volunteers for this project.

The following links are for external resources relating to victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

For research into the fate of individuals, The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names, compiled by Yad Vashem, is a good place to start.

A full list of deportations from the Nazi Reich, Belgium, France and the Netherlands can be found on the Bundesarchiv website.


Additional resources are available for specific countries. Resources relating to specific camps and ghettos are listed under the country where they were:

There are hundreds of educational and learning resources available online relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era. The following links represent a small selection that may be of use to students, educators and the public.

The following external links are for museums, archives, educational organisations and research institutions relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era.  They are organised alphabetically by country.

The following links are for external resources relating to victims and survivors of the Holocaust.

For research into the fate of individuals, The Central Database of Shoah Victims' Names, compiled by Yad Vashem, is a good place to start.

A full list of deportations from the Nazi Reich, Belgium, France and the Netherlands can be found on the Bundesarchiv website.


Additional resources are available for specific countries. Resources relating to specific camps and ghettos are listed under the country where they were:

There are hundreds of educational and learning resources available online relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era. The following links represent a small selection that may be of use to students, educators and the public.

The following external links are for museums, archives, educational organisations and research institutions relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era.  They are organised alphabetically by country.

Blog

Our frequently-updated blog contains posts on a variety of subjects related to our collections and outreach efforts. Posts include book reviews, opinion pieces, and descriptions of new Library acquisitions, events, and digital projects. Blog posts are written by Library staff, interns, and volunteers.

If you are between the ages of 16-24 and interested in becoming a volunteer blogger, please contact the Learning team at learning@wienerlibrary.co.uk to register your interest.

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Burning synagogue in Bamberg, Bavaria during the November Pogrom 1938

On November 9th and 10th 1938, simultaneously in hundreds of towns across Germany and Austria, thousands of Jews were terrorised, persecuted and victimised. The November Pogrom, known alternatively as 'Kristallnacht', also led to the desecration of over 1,200 synagogues and the looting of thousands of Jewish businesses and homes. Following the assassination of a junior diplomat in Paris by a young Polish Jew, the Nazi Party seized the opportunity to incite mass anti-Jewish violence. They nevertheless denied planning and orchestrating this wave of terror, claiming it instead as a spontaneous popular ‘retaliation’ against the ‘enemy within’. As a result approximately 90 people were killed and over 25,000 Jewish men were arrested and deported Dachau, Buchenwald and Sachsenhausen, leading to the deaths of hundreds more in the camps. The November Pogrom is seen by many as marking the beginning of the Holocaust. It triggered major policy changes as the Nazi regime began to pursue more aggressive measures against the Jews, which were nonetheless presented as ‘lawful’. 

Alfred Wiener had already been documenting Nazi crimes for many years when news of the November Pogrom first reached him and his colleagues in Amsterdam, which had been their place of refuge from Nazi persecution since 1933. From their headquarters at the Jewish Central Information Office (JCIO), Wiener used his unrivalled network of contacts to collect over 350 eyewitness accounts describing the events of 9 and 10 November in cities, towns and villages throughout Germany and Austria. The accounts took a number of different forms, including face-to-face and telephone interviews, letters, written reports and newspaper articles. Some of the voices are raw and angry, some call for help, others are defiant; they evoke the confusion, fear and chaos of the moment - capturing an important escalation in Nazi anti-Jewish terror that would soon lead toward the Holocaust.

The name(s) you designate will be inscribed on a plaque on the Wall of Honour at the Wiener Library, 29 Russell Square, London and displayed on our Digital Wall of Honour for a £2,000 donation.

If you wish to arrange for a plaque on our Wall of Honour, please complete the application form below.

The following links are for resources relating to genocides other than the Holocaust. They are sorted alphabetically by country, with a section for human rights organisations campaigning against genocide at the end.

27 October 2016 - 17 February 2017

Women and children climbing into a train car during the deportation of Jews, Czechoslovakia 1938

Deported Jews on the Czechoslovak-Hungarian border 1938

Photo by B. Birnbach; Wiener Library Photo Archive WL15019

Refugees Then and Now Series

Curator Chats

Reading Room Exhibition

At a time when violence and upheaval in Syria, Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq and elsewhere have created an upsurge in the number of refugees, many look to historical examples for potential continuities and solutions. Conflict and war, political, religious and ethnic persecution have always caused the displacement of populations. Civilians are forced from their homes, fearing for their safety and future.

This exhibition examines responses to Jewish and other refugees in Britain during the 1930s and 1940s. Built on the rich collection of refugee sources held by The Wiener Library, the exhibition explores a number of themes, including governmental policy on asylum and the kinds of assistance offered by humanitarian aid organisations at the international, national and local level. 

A Bitter Road also looks closely at the myriad experiences of Jewish refugees in Britain, including of surveillance and detention, poverty, separation and isolation. It highlights their resilience and means for coping with the hardships of integrating into a new society. Through the voices of refugees, A Bitter Road explores how refugees negotiated the road to safety and attempted to rebuild their lives. 

This timely exhibition raises important questions about historical examples of forced migration and Britain’s response in the past – and how the past can inform our responses to refugees today.

Follow the hashtag #ABitterRoad on Twitter for updates and responses to this exhibition. 

Purchase a copy of the exhibition catalogue for a selection of photographs and documents from our collections, personal refugee stories featured in the exhibition, and important historical context of Jewish refugees coming to Britain in the 1930s and 1940s. The catalogue is available to purchase at our Library's reception desk, amazon.co.uk and amazon.com.

Already seen the exhibition? Take our Visitor Survey and tell us what you thought.

The following external links are for genealogical resources. They are organised alphabetically by country. For Holocaust related genealogical resources, please see “Digital Holocaust collections and databases”.

The following external links are for museums and memorials relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era. They are organised alphabetically by country.

The following links are for Jewish museums and cultural centres as well as digital resources on Jewish life.  They are organised alphabetically by country, with a section for 'Eastern Europe'.

The following links are for digital collections, publications and exhibitions related to the Holocaust and Nazi era arranged alphabetically by country, with an 'International' section at the end. Also included are digital collections of eyewitness testimonies and union catalogues that allow for searching across multiple collections across different organisations.  

The following links are for education centres, associations, foundations and trusts relating to the Holocaust and Nazi era. They are organised alphabetically by country and include an 'International' section at the end.

The following links are for genealogical resources, including memorial books and databases. They are sorted alphabetically by country and include an 'International' section at the end with links to International Tracing Service (ITS) records and searches available online. 

The following external links are for Human Rights organisations and institutes focusing on genocide research.

The Philipp Manes Collection of documents and writings provides valuable insight into the artistic and intellectual endeavours of internees held in the Theresienstadt Ghetto, revealing a determination to continue as robust a cultural life as possible in the face of lethal threat and constant persecution.

Philipp Manes (1875-1944) belonged to an assimilated German Jewish family, and was a prolific writer with a lifelong habit of keeping records of his experiences.  Having dissolved his furrier business in the aftermath of the November Pogrom in 1938, Manes and his wife Gertrud were deported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in July 1942. Conditions and facilities in the ghetto, while undeniably dismal, were marginally better than those in the camps. This allowed a cultural life to develop. Manes would become an integral part of this community.

Shortly after arrival, Manes took charge of the Theresienstadt’s ‘Orientation Service,’ designed to help acclimatise bewildered new arrivals. The service soon broadened its original remit, and grew to include the so-called ‘Manes Group,’ which curated a lecture series of what turned out to be over 500 events. As well as lectures from prominent internee-scholars, there were also musical events, and readings from theatrical works. In addition to this, Manes also maintained his habit of keeping reflective records. This writing came to include nine notebooks and includes descriptions of daily life and interviews with prominent figures in the ghetto, interspersed with accounts of transports leaving for Auschwitz. These notebooks are held in our collections, along with three notebooks filled with poems, letters, and drawings by Manes’ co-internees, paying tribute to him and the cultural events he organised.

The final notebook breaks off mid sentence. On October 28, 1944, Philipp and Gertrud Manes were sent to Auschwitz in one of the last transports to leave Theresienstadt. However, his richly detailed account of life in the Theresienstadt ghetto survived the war and was sent to his daughter Eva, who eventually deposited it in The Wiener Library in 1995. An English language translation of Manes' writings, 'As if it were Life', was published in 2009.

Full document description of the Philipp Manes Collection

1 March 2017 – 28 April 2017

Help! a self-portrait from 1941 in pen and ink by Franciszka Themerson. In this drawing, produced in London, the figure of Franciszka Themerson is depicted alone with sinister-looking aircraft hovering overhead and the word Help! in capitals below.

Help! by Franciszka Themerson

[self-portrait], January 1941, pen and ink ©Franciszka Themerson

This exhibition traces the story of one family’s experiences of separation, persecution and survival during the Second World War and the Holocaust: the family of Franciszka Themerson and her niece Jasia Reichardt.

Originally from Warsaw, artist and illustrator Franciszka Themerson found herself alone in London during the war, separated from her husband, writer and film-maker Stefan Themerson, who was stranded in southern France, and the rest of her family, trapped inside the Warsaw Ghetto.

As deportation from the Ghetto intensified in the summer of 1942, Franciszka’s nine-year old niece Jasia Reichardt escaped. Jasia’s remarkable ’15 Journeys’ took her from the Ghetto in 1942 to London in 1946, where she was reunited with her aunt and uncle, as described in her 2012 memoir. From 1942-1946, Jasia experienced life in hiding, and finally lived in convents under an assumed Catholic identity.

This exhibition features family documents and photographs, and showcases some of the work of this highly creative family. There is also a display of sixteen original drawings made by Franciszka Themerson in London between 1940 and 1942, the drawings she called her ‘Unposted Letters’ to her husband separated from her in France. 

Supported by GV Art London.

International Tracing Service - Central Name Index

In December 2011, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office deposited the UK's digital copy of the International Tracing Service Archive at The Wiener Library. This unique archive contains over 100 million pages of Holocaust-era documents relating to the fates of over 17.5 million people who were subject to incarceration, forced labour and displacement during and after World War II. The archive is now available at the Library to those who wish to examine documents related to their own fate or to that of family members during World War II. The digital copy is also available for consultation in the Reading Room for those interested in conducting historical research within the collections. 

The International Tracing Service Archive, physically located in Bad Arolsen, Germany, is unique in its scope and significance. The result of a remarkable British initiative in 1943, the archive was originally founded by the British Red Cross as a Tracing Bureau with the aim of allowing the millions of people displaced and missing during the Second World War to trace, and be traced by, their families.

The digital copy of the ITS Archive at The Wiener Library provides access to around 95% of the original documents, including:

  • Documents on incarceration in concentration camps, ghettos and prisons
  • Registration cards of Displaced Persons
  • Documents on forced labour
  • Documents on DP Camps and emigration 
  • General historical documents and the inventory from the children's tracing branch

Search the General Inventory of the entire ITS Archive by keyword or browse via the inventory structure. 

Thanks to financial support from the Foreign Office, the Department for Communities and Local Government, the Heritage Lottery Fund and private donors, the Library has now opened the archive for humanitarian and scholarly research requests.  

How to Enter

To enter please send your manuscript and CV in electronic format only (PDF or Word file) to Neta Lavee on nlavee@wienerlibrary.co.uk.

If you have any questions regarding your submission, please email nlavee@wienerlibrary.co.uk.

Deadline for Entry

All entries must reach our office by 5.30pm on Tuesday, 2 May 2017.

Dr Alfred Wiener created a lasting legacy

Dr Alfred Wiener at his home in Golders Green, London, 1950s.

Dr Alfred Wiener at his home in Golders Green, London, 1950s.

WL1830

From 1919 Dr Alfred Wiener worked against the rising tide of right-wing extremism across Europe. His work setting up the Jewish Central Information Office (JCIO) and subsequently making these resources available to the British government, was unprecedented and far-reaching. After the war the JCIO adopted the name Wiener Library as Dr Wiener recast it as a place of learning and memory. Today the Library is the most important resource in Britain for serious study of the Nazi era and the Holocaust, and is increasingly seen as an indispensable collection relating to the history of other genocides. The Library plays a crucial role both as a public repository of evidence, and as a hub for researchers, educators and activists opposing genocide, racism, religious intolerance and political extremism. Dr Wiener’s legacy lives on...

… what might your legacy be?

Special Collections

The Library has a number of unique photograph collections, including:

Jewish Relief in Post-war Europe
The Jewish Committee for Relief Abroad established the Jewish Relief Unit (JRU) – an active service unit for carrying out welfare work among the surviving remnant of European Jewry in Germany. 

Read more about Jewish Relief in Post-war Europe

The Ludwig Neumann Collection
This is part of an exemplary collection of documents (see Document Collection 1023) and photographs of a Jewish family who were forced to leave Germany in the 1930s.  Ludwig Neumann was born in 1896. Having served during World War I, he became the sole owner of the company Neumann and Mendel in 1923 after the death of his father.

Read more about The Ludwig Neumann Collection

The Motorcycle Album
The Motorcycle Album is a rare example of pictures originally created by the Jewish Central Information Office which later became The Wiener Library. It is a small but distinct collection and it allows us an insight into the campaigning work of Dr Wiener and his colleagues in Amsterdam.

Read more about The Motorcycle Album

Portrait Collection 
Photographs of eminent and infamous individuals of twentieth century European history, including a large collection of German military personnel. The collection includes portraits of high-profile individuals across politics, culture and Judaism as well as rescuers and survivors of the Holocaust.

Read more about our Portrait Collection

Borrowing Books

Only Members or Friends of the Wiener Library may borrow books.  If you would like to become a Member please see our Becoming a Member page. Please see the Friends section for details on how to become a Friend of the Library.

How to Adopt a Book

To adopt a book, have a look at the gift levels and benefits below, and choose how much money you would like to donate.  Then select the book you wish to adopt, and buy online or by downloading the application form below.

downloads/Adopt_a_Book_Application_Form.pdf

Lifts and Access

Outdoor lift at entrance of The Wiener Library

In 2011 the Library moved to new premises in a historic location in Russell Square. There is a disabled lift outside of the building, and once inside the building, all floors are accessible via the indoor lift.

In the case of an emergency evacuation of the building, evacuation chairs are available. Visitors with mobility impairments or conditions which preclude them from using evacuation chairs are advised to inform the Library prior to their visit.

For visitors that are unable to attend our lectures due to access issues, we are happy to provide you with recordings free of charge. If you are interested in this service, please contact the Library.

We encourage visitors to contact us in advance if they are concerned about access. For those that are unable to access the building, the Library will provide a document delivery service in an accessible Reading Room nearby at Birkbeck, University of London.

Dedication of the Book

This book is dedicated to Ernst and Thilde Fraenkel, in honour of their both having celebrated their 90th birthday in the year The Wiener Library turned 80. Ernst Fraenkel OBE was Chairman of The Wiener Library from 1990 to 2003 and is currently its Joint President with Alan Montefiore.

Since publication of the book, Ernst Fraenkel OBE has passed away. He will be greatly missed.

Special Collections

Within the archive we have a number of unique serial collections which are of particular interest to researchers.

Special Collections

The Library hold several notable audio-visual collections, including:

General Learning Materials and Information

Learning: Voices of the Holocaust
The British Library

BBC History: World War Two
BBC

The Holocaust Encyclopaedia
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Online Exhibits
USC Shoah Foundation

The Holocaust Explained
London Jewish Cultural Centre

The Holocaust
Yad Vashem

The International Status of Education about the Holocaust
co-edited by UNESCO and the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research

Killing Sites - Research and Remembrance
International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

Teaching Materials for the Discussion of the Holocaust
Fritz Bauer Institut (in German)

Cultures of History Forum
Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena

Flight, Exile and Persecution - Divided Memory Spaces
Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (ASF) and Touro College Berlin (in German, English, and Turkish)

National Socialism and the Holocaust: Memory and the Present
Erinnern.at (in German)

Blogger

We are currently recruiting a team of Volunteer Bloggers to contribute regularly to The Wiener Library Blog by writing articles about significant anniversaries, Library events, reviews of books/films or current issues relating to the Library.

images/medium/Blogger.pdf

How Useful is Social Media for Raising Awareness of the Holocaust and Genocide?

With Katy Jackson, Community and Outreach Worker at The Wiener Library
Tuesday 29 January 2013, 7pm

 

The Wiener Library's Young Volunteers hosted a special interactive discussion workshop for 16-25 year olds to mark Holocaust Memorial Day 2013. Discussed were the pros and cons of using social media from Twitter to Facebook and Flickr to raise awareness and promote learning about the Holocaust and genocide. One of the main contributors was Josh Zietcer, founder of @memorialproject, a Twitter campaign encouraging people to remember the Holocaust.

Members of the public were able to join or follow the discussion on Twitter by following the hashtag #WLdebate.

Displaced

On 6 March, World's Book Day, we annouced the winners of our International Artists' Book Competition 2014.

The winners are:

“Uprooted”, the winning altered book entry by Julia Mason is a haunting depiction of refugees rising out of a partially burnt book. Depicting men, women and children, some with luggage, greyish with flakes from the burnt pages the piece clearly illustrates the eternal link between violence and refugee movements.

“12”, the winning artist book entry by is a collaboration between Simona Noli and Toby Martinez de las Rivas. The main themes of the book are absence, loss, violence and the importance of commemoration. A complex piece, bound with rusty iron sheets to evoke the remains of camps can be seen on YouTube. 

The two commended entries are:

“The White Maiden Male” by Jeff Morin, one of two commended entries, weaves together a German folk tale and the story of Rudolf Brazda, a gay camp survivor. In beautifully poetic language the book narrates how Nazi repression of homosexuality and his subsequent deportation to Buchenwald in 1942 impacted on his life.

“The Purple Velvet Bag” by Judy Tova Wilkenfeld, one of two commended entries, was made in memory of her father. A perspex box with four compartments holds a book telling the story of his flight across Europe, Tefillin and a Tallit, and Siddur texts. Not only were Jewish people displaced but, so too, the religious items that were for so many, fundamental to their day-to-day living.  

Explore a selection of the entries on our new Pinterest page.

20 February 2014-19 March 2014

The Wiener Library’s new exhibition ‘Hans Gál – Music in Exile’ explores the life and music of the Austrian-British composer Hans Gál, who was forced to emigrate from Vienna to Britain in 1938 as a result of Nazi persecution of Jewish musicians. Gál was arguably the last major composer in the Germanic tradition of classicism that ran directly from Bach through Beethoven to Brahms. Gál’s blossoming career was, however, dramatically interrupted by Hitler’s early antisemitic purges of the German music world. This exhibition explores the aspects of Gál’s life and music that were irretrievably cut off by his exile, and the elements that survived and thrived against the odds. 

‘Hans Gál: Music in Exile’ is produced by The Wiener Library and the University of Music and Drama (Rostock) with the support of the Austrian Cultural Forum, Exilarte Austrian Contact Point for Exiled Music, the Centre for Ostracised Music (Rostock) and the Royal College of Music. It forms part of an EU-funded project co-ordinated by Jeunesses Musicales Mecklenberg-Vorpommern on European Strategies for Holocaust Remembrance (ESTHER). 

Admission is free.

images/medium/SupporterLogosforGal.JPG

For more information about the travelling exhibitions, please download the Travelling Exhibitions Information below.

images/medium/Travelling_Exhibitions_Information.pdf

Creative Writing Workshop

The Wiener Library and Exiled Writers Ink hosted a creative writing workshop to mark Refugee Week in June 2013.

Participants used photographs and documents from the Library’s collections to write creatively on the theme of refugee experience.

Four of the participants have kindly agreed to have extracts of their writing published here.

images/medium/Workshop_Photos.pdf

Translation and Publication of Testimonies

On the 75th commemoration year of these tragic events, the Wiener Library decided to publish the documents in English as a book and a fully searchable online digital resource. On 11 November 2015, the public will be able to benefit from this effort with the publication of Pogrom – November 1938: Testimonies from ‘Kristallnacht’, edited by Ruth Levitt and published by Souvenir Press. On this day, this project page will be replaced by the companion website for this important collection, developed in collaboration with Imagiz. Contextual historical information, images and a bespoke glossary will also be included in both resources. The purpose is to remove the language barrier and enable historians, researchers, students, teachers and others internationally to understand and use information in English about this crucial milestone on the road to the Holocaust. 

For this project the Library is benefiting from the generous engagement and support of many individuals and organisations, including the translators, staff and students at King’s College London and University College London, colleagues at Mémorial de la Shoah, and the Dulverton Trust, among others.

The Wiener Library welcomes your comments, queries and suggestions for the project. Please contact us at novemberpogrom@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Senior Management Team

Third Generation

The Wiener Library is bringing together for the first time a new group of grandchildren of Holocaust survivors and refugees. The group met for the first time in June 2014 and have since met for a genealogy workshop. The date for the next group meeting will be posted soon.

If you would like to join the group or be put on the mailing list to receive updates please contact our Learning team at learning@wienerlibrary.co.uk.

In Lieu of Flowers

Some Library supporters choose to ask for donations to the Library in lieu of giving flowers at a funeral.  We are very happy to help with this and can provide donation forms for you to distribute at the ceremony.

If you would like to make a donation in memory of a friend or relative, you may choose to donate in the following ways:

By cheque or charity voucher:
Please make it payable to The Wiener Library and send it to:

The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London
WC1B 5DP

Online:
Please make your donation through our 'Make a donation' page.

For more information, please call 020 7636 76247 or email development@wienerlibrary.co.uk.

Dedication of the Book

This book is dedicated to Ernst and Thilde Fraenkel, in honour of their both having celebrated their 90th birthday in the year The Wiener Library turned 80. Ernst Fraenkel OBE was Chairman of The Wiener Library from 1990 to 2003 and is currently its Joint President with Alan Montefiore.

Since publication of the book, Ernst Fraenkel OBE has passed away. He will be greatly missed.

The following four consecutive PDF finding aids give a detailed overview of the subjects covered in the archive: 

images/medium/Press_Archive_1933_1945_1.pdf

General Learning Materials and Information

Learning: Voices of the Holocaust
The British Library

BBC History: World War Two
BBC

The Holocaust Encyclopaedia
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Online Exhibits
USC Shoah Foundation

The Holocaust Explained
London Jewish Cultural Centre

The Holocaust
Yad Vashem

The International Status of Education about the Holocaust
co-edited by UNESCO and the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research

Killing Sites - Research and Remembrance
International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

Teaching Materials for the Discussion of the Holocaust
Fritz Bauer Institut (in German)

Cultures of History Forum
Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena

Flight, Exile and Persecution - Divided Memory Spaces
Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (ASF) and Touro College Berlin (in German, English, and Turkish)

General Learning Materials and Information

Learning: Voices of the Holocaust
The British Library

BBC History: World War Two
BBC

The Holocaust Encyclopaedia
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Online Exhibits
USC Shoah Foundation

The Holocaust Explained
London Jewish Cultural Centre

The Holocaust
Yad Vashem

The International Status of Education about the Holocaust
co-edited by UNESCO and the Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research

Killing Sites - Research and Remembrance
International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

Teaching Materials for the Discussion of the Holocaust
Fritz Bauer Institut (in German)

Cultures of History Forum
Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena

Flight, Exile and Persecution - Divided Memory Spaces
Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (ASF) and Touro College Berlin (in German, English, and Turkish)

Twitter

Our presence on Twitter (@wienerlibrary) has steadily grown over the past several years to include over 4,000 followers. We make an effort to tweet several times every day on a variety of subjects that may be of interest to our users and the general public. Topics include updates on opening hours, events, exhibitions, workshops, and collection highlights, as well as external conferences, partnership information, and subject-related national/international news.

We also engage in national and international social media campaigns, including #explorearchives, #AskACurator Day, and #AskAnArchivist Day. Read the blog posts about our involvement in #AskACurator Day on 17 September 2014 and 16 September 2015 to see some of the highlights.

To mark the week of Holocaust Memorial Day 2016, the Wiener Library hosted its fourth annual Social Media Debate. This year’s topic was: “How should hashtags be used on the topic of the Holocaust and other genocides?”

Follow us on Twitter

Hans & Else's engagement in 1928

Else and Hans Briess, commemorated on the Wall of Honour, see below

All names on the Wiener Library Wall of Honour in Great Russell Street can be viewed here on our Digital Wall of Honour.

This is where biographical information, photographs and reflections can be recorded and shared regarding those honoured with a commemorative plaque at the Library.

Please click on a name from the list below to be taken to their dedicated page.

If you happen to know one of those honoured here and wish to share an anecdote or a picture, please feel free to upload it under the comment section below the individual entry.

To share biographical information, photographs or a special message please contact the Development Coordinator at The Wiener Library on 020 7636 7247 or at development@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Wall of Honour Order Form

Translation and Publication of Testimonies

On the 75th commemoration year of these tragic events, the Wiener Library decided to publish the documents in English as a book and a fully searchable online digital resource. On 11 November 2015, the public will be able to benefit from this effort with the publication of Pogrom – November 1938: Testimonies from ‘Kristallnacht’, edited by Ruth Levitt and published by Souvenir Press. On this day, this project page will be replaced by the companion website for this important collection, developed in collaboration with Imagiz. Contextual historical information, images and a bespoke glossary will also be included in both resources. The purpose is to remove the language barrier and enable historians, researchers, students, teachers and others internationally to understand and use information in English about this crucial milestone on the road to the Holocaust. 

For this project the Library is benefiting from the generous engagement and support of many individuals and organisations, including the translators, staff and students at King’s College London and University College London, colleagues at Mémorial de la Shoah, and the Dulverton Trust, among others.

The Wiener Library welcomes your comments, queries and suggestions for the project. Please contact us at novemberpogrom@wienerlibrary.co.uk

Armenian Genocide (1915-1923)

The Armenian National Institute (ANI)
The Armenian National Institute is an independent organization based in Washington DC dedicated to the study, research and affirmation of the Armenian Genocide. Its website features educational resources, an insight into international recognition of the genocide and the institute’s collections, as well as an online museum.

The Genocide Education Project
The project aims to assist educators in teaching about the Armenian Genocide by distributing materials and providing access to teaching resources and workshops. Its resource library for teachers features teaching guides, videos, documents, maps and survivor accounts. 

Armenian Genocide Museum of America
The online museum features a short film titled “Coming to Terms: The Legacy of the Armenian Genocide” as well as an audio-visual history of Armenia and the Armenian Genocide. Multiple galleries, a map and downloads will be made available soon.

Facing History
Facing History’s Armenian Genocide resource collection allows students and teachers to examine genocide prevention, the dangers of nationalism, the limits of sovereignty, justice after genocide, and nation building through resources including lessons, units, videos, a timeline, library resources and a map. 
Follow @facinghistory

Genocide 1915
The website ‘Genocide 1915’ aims to inform about the Armenian Genocide and demand the affirmation of it as such. The website provides photos, a detailed timeline and external links.

Flight, Exile and Persecution - Divided Memory Spaces (Action Reconciliation Service for Peace (ASF) and Touro College Berlin)
The project explores the traces of Armenian-German-Turkish stories of flight, exile and persecution to give insight into their relationship relating to National Socialism and the Armenian Genocide. Users can use the audio guides to find links between the memories by taking a look at the traces found along the Hardenbergstrasse in Berlin.

Australia

Sydney Jewish Museum
The museum, opened in 1992, aims to document and teach the history of the Holocaust. The websites features information about visiting the museum, events, tours, past and present exhibitions and its collection. The ‘Learn’ section provides resources for teachers as well as a resource centre. 
Follow @SydJewishMuseum

Austria

Jewish Museum Vienna
The Jewish Museum in Vienna, established in 1895, is the world’s oldest Jewish Museum. The website features a visual archive of the exhibitions, its podcast collection, videos, and information about the museum’s events. 
Follow @jewishmuseumVIE

Czech Republic

Czech Heritage Action Initiative (CHAI)
The CHAI aims to help the Czech Jewish community to restore its heritage and build connections between the communities. They also support restoring and preserving Jewish cemeteries and synagogues in the Czech Republic. On their website, users can read about CHAI’s mission and their current projects.

Eastern Europe

The YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe
The encyclopaedia provides a picture of the history and culture of Jews in Eastern Europe since the first settlement in the region. Topics include art, daily life, places, language, history, politics and religion and feature maps, images, audio, video and documents.
Follow @yivoinstitute

Estonia

Estonian Jewish Museum
The Estonian Jewish Museum aims to show the life of Estonian Jews from the 19th century onward. The building includes a main exhibition, an archive and a reading room. The website provides information about the museum and its catalogue as well as the digital Estonian Jewry Archive which is organised by themes and can be searched by keyword.

Germany

Jewish Museum Frankfurt
The Jewish Museum Frankfurt shows the life of the Jewish communities in Frankfurt from the 12th to the 20th centuries. The other branch of the museum, the Museum Judengasse, is located in a different part of town. The website provides information about the museum and its history, departments, publications, events, exhibitions, and educational programme.

Jewish Museum Berlin
The Jewish Museum Berlin, established in September 2001, is one of the largest Jewish Museums in Europe, displaying two millennia of German-Jewish history. The website features information about the museum, its history and educational programme as well as providing digital content and access to special digital exhibitions. 
Follow @jmberlin

Centrum Judaicum – Neue Synagoge Berlin 
The golden-domed New Synagogue was first inaugurated in 1866, being the largest synagogue of its day. The museum and information centre located within it aims to document and archive the Jewish life in Berlin. The website provides information about the synagogue and its history, its exhibitions, archive, publications and events.

Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture at Leipzig University
The institute was established in 1995 to research the lives of Jews in Central and Eastern Europe. On their website, users can learn about the institute’s history, events, courses, and publications. There is detailed information about the research projects and different serials and bulletins.

Compact Memory: Internet Archive of Jewish Periodicals
The resource features 180 of the most important periodicals of the German-Jewish communities between 1768 and 1938. Users can print, save and search the periodicals by language, name of publisher, places and document types.

Synagogue Internet Archive (Darmstadt Technical University)
The Synagogue Internet Archive provides information about more than 2200 German and Austrian synagogues, including images, text, comments and links. The archive is classified in synagogues that existed in 1933, that were built after 1945 and synagogues from the Middle Ages.

SchUM Cities
The German cities of Mainz, Speyer and Worms constitute the birthplace of Judaism in Europe and have been known as the SchUM Cities since the High Middle Ages. This website links out to resources about the history of the Jewish communities in these three cities and provides tourist information for travellers. 

Key Documents of German-Jewish History: A Digital Source Edition
This online source edition published by the Institute for the History of German Jews (IGdJ) highlights key aspects in Hamburg’s Jewish history from the early modern age to the present using a selection of 'key documents'. This resource is targeted at college students, researchers and teachers, as well as the interested public and high school students. Browse the selection of "key documents" through a timeline, specific topic, map, or full-text search. 

Greece

The Jewish Museum of Greece
The website provides information about the museum, its collection, educational programme and exhibitions. Images of the museum’s wide range of artifacts and a list of external resources can be viewed online.

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki
The museum aims to present the history of Sephardic Jews and Jewish life in Thessaloniki. The website features information about the museum and its history, collections, exhibitions and events. Digital resources such as the library catalogue are also available.

Hungary

Hungarian Jewish Museum
The website provides information about the museum and its exhibitions and collections. It also grants access to extensive tools for researchers, databases and digital content.

Italy

Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History (Fondazione Centro di Documentazione Ebraica Contemporanea)
The open access online journal publishes a collection of articles surrounding the history of Jewish communities between the mid-18th and the beginning of the 21st century. Submissions are free and subject to a double-blind peer review process.

Foundation Jewish Contemporary Documentation Center (CDEC)
The CDEC’s collections explore the history of Jews in Italy and include books, periodicals, videos and databases. Users can find the centre’s web resources on the left hand side, where links to the digital library and catalogues are provided.

Lithuania

The Vilna Gaon Jewish State Museum
The Vilna Gaon State Jewish Museum aims to collect and exhibit the spiritual heritage of Lithuanian Jews. The website provides information about the museum, its exposition sites and activity. Users can view virtual exhibitions online.

The Netherlands

Digital Monument to the Jewish Community in the Netherlands (Jewish Historical Museum, Amsterdam) 
The digital monument aims to preserve the memory of persecuted Jews by having a separate page commemorating every victim. Each page shows the circumstances of the person and their family relationships. Addresses were included to allow for virtual walks through towns. 
Follow @jckamsterdam

Poland

Museum of the History of Polish Jews
The Museum of the History of Polish Jews, opened in April 2013, is a cultural and educational centre. The website provides information about the museum, its exhibitions and educational programme. The library catalogue can be searched online. 
Follow @polinmuseum

Auschwitz Jewish Center
The Auschwitz Jewish Center includes a Jewish Museum, an education centre and the Oświęcim Synagogue, the only surviving synagogue in town. The website gives information about the museum and its exhibition as well as the history of both the museum and the synagogue. 

Galicia Jewish Museum
The museum was established in 2004 and documents Jewish history and culture of the Polish Galicia in a photo exhibition. The website allows for browsing of previous and current exhibitions as well as the educational resources.

Virtual Shtetl
Virtual Shtetl is a project that will in the future include an interactive system for users. Currently, the website contains information about the history of Polish Jews and their circumstances, including a map.

YIVO Digital Archive on Jewish Life in Poland 
After being founded in Vilna in 1925, YIVO published over 2,000 research titles related to the study of Polish Jewry, which were ransacked during the war and rediscovered afterwards.  On their website, users can browse highlights from their archival collections, including documents, posters, and photographs as well as online exhibitions, galleries and finding aids. 
Follow @yivoinstitute

Judaica Foundation – Center for Jewish Culture
Judaica Foundation was established in Cracow in the 1980s with the aim to preserve Jewish heritage and create a platform for Polish-Jewish dialogue. The website provides information about the centre, its activities, programmes, and publications.

United Kingdom

Manchester Jewish Museum
The Manchester Jewish Museum is located inside the oldest surviving synagogue in Manchester, a former Spanish and Portuguese synagogue. The website features information about the museum, exhibitions, events and its collections. 
Follow @ManJewishMuseum

Jewish Museum London 
The Jewish Museum London aims to engage people in the history and culture of Jews in Britain. On their website, users can explore and search the museum’s collections. Information about the museum, its exhibitions, events and educational programme are also available.
Follow @JewishMuseumLDN

JW3 (London Jewish Cultural Centre)
JW3 is a community centre and arts venue that opened in 2013 and was merged with the London Jewish Cultural Centre (LJCC) in 2015. On their website, users can browse the events that feature arts, cinema, classes & courses, health, fitness, languages, and trips. The podcast ‘Sounds Jewish’ is also available online. 
Follow @jw3london

Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR) Journal
The website allows users to browse every issue of the Journal of the Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR) since its first edition in 1946. The search box allows searching for words or entire sentences. 

United States of America

Museum of Jewish Heritage (New York) 
The museum aims to present Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust in their core and special exhibitions. Their public programmes include films, plays, concerts, and discussions. On their website, users can browse the museum’s online collection and exhibitions and access learning material for teachers and students. 
Follow @mjhnews

Leo Baeck Institute (LBI)
The Leo Baeck Institute aims to represent the history of German-speaking Jewry with its 80,000-volume library and archival and art collections. The website provides research guides and detailed information about the collections, publications, and exhibitions. 
Follow @lbinyc